Tag

Exercise

Does low iron intake change exercise capacity?

A study demonstrates metabolic shifts that occur with and without sufficient iron levels

You’re never too old to start exercising – just ask a 93-year-old rowing champion

Geroscience researchers report an astounding case study of a nonagenarian with the physical fitness of a 40-year-old

#276 ‒ Special episode: Peter answers questions on longevity, supplements, protein, fasting, apoB, statins, and more

One of the most important things to understand when you are using some sort of intervention is, do you have a biomarker to know if you’re doing it correctly?” —Peter Attia

#271 – AMA #51: Understanding and improving your metabolic health

Zone 2 output is arguably the most important functional test we have of metabolic health.” —Peter Attia

#258 – AMA #48: Blood pressure—how to measure, manage, and treat high blood pressure

If you care about your brain, if you care about your heart and if you care about your kidneys, you need low blood pressure. I think we can say that as confidently as we can say almost anything in medicine.” —Peter Attia

Supramaximal exercise transiently raises serum uric acid

Why exercise-related acute fluctuations in this biomarker shouldn’t be a cause for distress

#252 ‒ Latest insights on Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, exercise, nutrition, and fasting | Rhonda Patrick, Ph.D.

My perspective has shifted as any scientist that’s following data should… When new data comes out, you have to reassess things.” —Rhonda Patrick

#251 – AMA #46: Optimizing brain health: Alzheimer’s disease risk factors, APOE, prevention strategies, and more

The bottom line here is the earlier you were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the higher your risk of dementia.” —Peter Attia

#250 ‒ Training principles for longevity | Andy Galpin, Ph.D. (PART II)

The best marathoners in the world would smash almost everyone you know in a 100-meter dash. They’re blazingly fast.” —Andy Galpin

Can a new drug mimic the effects of exercise on bone and muscle?

Researchers have recently discovered that a new drug called locamidazole may help to prevent loss of bone density and muscle mass during periods of inactivity, but it’s no substitute for all of the benefits of exercise.

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