Category

Aging

Learn more about age-related topics, including healthspan, lifespan, centenarians, genes, hallmarks of aging, and longevity.

Aging

#175 – Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D.: The biology of aging, rapamycin, and other interventions that target the aging process

“I don’t think I will ever understand aging fully. And I don’t think the field will. … But I also believe that we don’t have to understand it fully to be able to have an impact on the biology of aging through interventions.” —Matt Kaeberlein

Aging

Funding geroscience; suggested podcast listening

Revisiting the podcast archive

Aging

#171 – Steve Austad, Ph.D.: The landscape of longevity science: making sense of caloric restriction, biomarkers of aging, and possible geroprotective molecules

“I never thought [extending the human lifespan] was going to happen because we got better at treating cancer or we got better at preventing heart disease. I always thought it was going to happen because we would develop something … that would fundamentally change the rate of aging. And we haven’t developed that yet. We’ve got a lot of clues and I think we’re getting closer and closer and closer.” —Steve Austad

Aging

How long can we live?; suggested listening

Revisiting the podcast archive 

Weekly Emails

Protecting against hearing loss

Considerations to protect the ability to hear across a lifespan

Aging

A few things worth sharing: 10-04-2020

Longevity in mice; The wonders of F1.

Aging

#123 – Joan Mannick, M.D. & Nir Barzilai, M.D.: Rapamycin and metformin—longevity, immune enhancement, and COVID-19

“I think what the mTOR inhibitors are doing is not stopping people from getting infected [with a virus], but if you get infected, there’s a better immune response and your symptoms will be milder.” — Joan Mannick

Aging

How to find a good doctor

One of the most common questions I encounter, in one form or another, is “How can I find a good…

Aging

#118 – Lloyd Klickstein, M.D., Ph.D.: Rapamycin, mTOR inhibition, and the biology of aging

“Our approach is to address serious aging-associated diseases, and if we’re successful, the side effect will be longevity.” — Lloyd Klickstein

Aging

#112 – Ned David, Ph.D.: How cellular senescence influences aging, and what we can do about it

“What you see in these diseases of aging is often the sort of unintended consequences of a system that was absolutely awesome for the young, at the expense of the old.” — Ned David

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