August 20, 2018

Podcast

Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D.: rapamycin and dogs — man’s best friends? — living longer, healthier lives and turning back the clock on aging and age-related diseases (EP.10)

"I believe that rigorously demonstrating that we can increase healthspan and lifespan in pet dogs will be a huge step toward gaining the support and credibility that the field needs." —Matt Kaeberlein

by Peter Attia

Read Time 10 minutes

Matt is someone who is deeply interested in understanding the biology of aging. Why do we age? What happens to us as we age? What are the things we can do to slow the aging process? How can we delay or prevent the onset of age-related diseases? These are all questions that Matt thinks deeply about, and explores these questions with his research at the University of Washington. He is currently investigating many of these questions through the Dog Aging Project and the compound rapamycin—the only known pharmacological agent to extend lifespan all the way from yeast to mammals—across a billion years of evolution. We talk about cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, healthspan, lifespan, and what we can do to provide longer, healthier lives for both people and dogs.

We discuss:

  • Matt’s early years and his aha moment on aging [4:00];
  • Studying dogs [6:30];
  • Dogs, rapamycin, and its effects on lifespan and healthspan [15:30];
  • An unexpected finding in presumably healthy dogs [36:00];
  • Rapamycin in cancer treatment [50:00];
  • Why isn’t there a rapamycin trial for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)? [1:01:30];
  • If Matt could do a definitive study on life extension in dogs, with resources not being a concern, what does that experiment look like? [1:16:00]; and
  • More.

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