Category

Nutritional Biochemistry

I often get asked, ‘Which diet works best?’. In my view, this is simply the wrong question. Nutritional biochemistry is a powerful lever in our longevity toolkit, but it is much more than fad diets or the number on the bathroom scale. A better question might be, “how can I use nutrition to support my metabolic health?”

Reframing the goal toward metabolic health is a critical starting point. From there, you can combine general principles of nutrition science (such as how much protein you need) with personalization tactics (such as using a CGM to monitor glucose levels) to build a nutrition plan that makes sense for you.

See the collection of audio clips, podcasts, and articles below to learn more about my nutrition and fasting framework.

Don’t drink and science: why a study on the cognitive effects of wine and cheese is sheer stupidity

A study claiming that daily consumption of cheese and wine may improve long-term cognition seems more like a bad joke than reliable science.

#252 ‒ Latest insights on Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, exercise, nutrition, and fasting | Rhonda Patrick, Ph.D.

My perspective has shifted as any scientist that’s following data should… When new data comes out, you have to reassess things.” —Rhonda Patrick

Is a recent clinical trial enough to support the use of semaglutide in treating adolescent obesity?

The imperative for effective weight management strategies in children and teens is clear, but in our desperation for effective obesity treatments, are we allowing ourselves to be too shortsighted on testing?

More hype than substance: erythritol and cardiovascular risk

A newly-published study caught public attention by reporting an association between the common sweetener erythritol and increased risk of heart attack and stroke, but there’s more to the story.

#242 – AMA #44: Peter’s historical changes in body composition with his evolving dietary, fasting, and training protocols

“Trends matter. You’re treating what you see, but you’re mindful of the trends.” —Peter Attia

To reduce appetite, skip late-night snacks

Two recent randomized trials found that biasing food intake toward the end of the day increases appetite and may reduce energy expenditure.

Non-caffeine components of coffee and their effects on neurodegenerative diseases

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative processes, but the effect may be more than a matter of caffeine.

#235 ‒ Training principles for mass and strength, changing views on nutrition, creatine supplementation, and more | Layne Norton, Ph.D.

Most 40 year olds, 50 year olds, they have pain anyway. So I’d rather be strong and have pain than be weak and have pain.” —Layne Norton

#227 – AMA #40: Body composition, protein, time-restricted feeding, fasting, DEXA scans, and more

“We don’t want to be consuming protein for energy purposes at all. We want to be consuming protein for muscle protein synthesis.” —Peter Attia

#224 ‒ Dietary protein: amount needed, ideal timing, quality, and more | Don Layman, Ph.D.

We want weight loss, but we don’t want people to lose any lean mass. Especially if they’re adults.” —Don Layman

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