October 18, 2018

Podcast

Tom Dayspring, M.D., FACP, FNLA – Part IV of V: statins, ezetimibe, PCSK9 inhibitors, niacin, cholesterol and the brain (EP.23)

"This is what it ultimately comes down to – and it's the way you practice – you've got to individualize everything." –Tom Dayspring

by Peter Attia

Read Time 78 minutes

In this five-part series, Thomas Dayspring, M.D., FACP, FNLA, a world-renowned expert in lipidology, and one of Peter’s most important clinical mentors, shares his wealth of knowledge on the subject of lipids. In Part IV, Peter and Tom review the history and current use of drugs to prevent cardiovascular disease. They also discuss why some drugs appear to be more effective than others, an in-depth conversation about niacin, cholesterol and brain health, and the futility of using CKs (creatinine kinase) and liver function tests to identify adverse effects in statins, to name a few topics in this episode.

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We discuss:

  • Bile acid sequestrants and statins [2:00];
  • Ezetimibe (Zetia) [15:00];
  • PCSK9 inhibitors [27:30];
  • Fibrates [41:00];
  • Fish oil, DHA, and EPA [1:01:00];
  • Niacin [1:05:15];
  • PCSK9 inhibitors [1:23:45];
  • Cholesterol, statins, and the brain [1:30:00];
  • Elevated creatine kinase (CK) and liver function tests (LFTs) on statins [1:50:30]; and
  • More.
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